Tag Archives: nesting best practices

JIT Nesting Software Helps You Respond to Changes in One Machine Cycle

JIT Nesting Software Helps Respond to Change

JIT Nesting Software Helps Respond to Change

We often hear from programmers and engineers  about the hours upon hours they spend librarying parts, creating programs, and optimizing tool paths.  Then they hope nothing changes in the schedule to disrupt their much-labored-over work.  And you know how the story ends.  Something happens – it always does – that throws the schedule into a tailspin, the nests are scrambled, the work starts over, and someone loses their lunch break just to keep the ball rolling.  Meanwhile that equipment is still waiting; waiting impatiently with its metaphorical metronome ticking – loudly.

The solution to this time-and-time-again proven problem is simple.  Just wait until the very last minute – seconds – before the laser, punch or other fabrication equipment has completed the current nest and the operator has unloaded it to create the next nest.  That very next nest would reflect precisely current demand – orders, order quantities, part revisions, and material inventory – and prevent the dreaded last minute scramble to accommodate any and all changes.

It’s possible to do this.  Really.   Allow me to introduce you to “Just-in-Time Nesting.” Read more …

4 Nesting Strategies to Manage Cut Part Production

Optimation Nested Parts

Optimation Nested Parts

A nesting strategy – to be distinguished from nesting software – that is suitable for a job shop may not work for an OEM.  A made-to-order shop may need different nesting strategies than a shop that uses Kanban.  A nesting strategy perfect for a small shop, may be ill-suited for a multi-facility corporation.  Why?  Because each company has different resources and different production objectives, both factor into the choice of a nesting strategy.

Often, the manufacturing engineering team is challenged to determine which strategy – or strategies – is best suited to achieve their production goals.  When choosing a nesting strategy they must consider productivity, material efficiency, order cohesion, and most of all, the labor resources available.

Similarly, the team is challenged by resource constraints.  There are only so many programmers, a limited number of hours in the day, a material budget, storage space allocations, machine speed, etc.

Making the most of the resources to achieve the right goals through nesting with CNC nesting software is a nesting strategy.

What’s the best strategy to use?  Let’s look at several choices…

Read more …

CAD to CAM | 4 Best Practices Relaying Manufacturing Data

How to Manage Manufacturing Data | CAD to CAM

Relaying Information from CAD to CAM

Today we spoke to a manufacturer, who shared with us his process of taking geometries from AutoCad® to his nesting package.  It seems he exports them out of AutoCad, saves as DWG files segregated by material type, strips out all the non-cutting, non-tool path data by hand, and saves these edited files in another file for retrieval from the nesting software.

Maybe a piece or two of this cumbersome and frustration-ripe story resonates with your experiences or the experiences of another company you’ve heard about.  It strikes me that in this scenario, there can be a lot of opportunities for error in passing manufacturing data from CAD to CAM by missing a step, grabbing the wrong file, or processing parts based on incorrect information.  Ouch.  If this rings even a little true to you, allow me to suggest a few alternative ways of looking at this process that could save significant time, error, and frustration. Read more …